Tilth Restaurant


Since Frank Bruni’s Dinner…
March 13, 2009, 5:26 pm
Filed under: From Maria

Hi, Everyone,

It’s hard to believe it’s been a year since Frank Bruni’s review appeared in the New York times. I was blown away by the effect of that review and how it brought so many new guests to Tilth. I am grateful for the support from such a prestigious restaurant critic and publication.

Well, we hope to see you soon — even if it’s just for a glass of wine and a quick bite.

Cheers,

Maria

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Honest Food
January 20, 2009, 9:52 pm
Filed under: Maria Hines (Chef/Owner), Where Maria Eats

I finally made it to Cascina Spinasse and I loved it. I loved it for how honest the food is. Check it out: spinasse.com.

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Roots and NPR
January 8, 2009, 9:52 pm
Filed under: In the Media, Maria Hines (Chef/Owner), Recipes

I was a guest on the Cooking Klatch segment of Sound Focus with Megan Sukys yesterday. We chatted about root vegetables. You can listen to the segment at this link. Here are the recipes.

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Happy New Year!
December 30, 2008, 11:30 pm
Filed under: About Tilth, From Maria

What a year it’s been! We started out with a life-changing review from Frank Bruni of The New York Times. We are grateful to everyone who helped make our 2007 strong enough to attract the attention of one of the most well-known restaurant critics in the country. That review granted us a bustling 2008, which in turn allowed us to purchase additional equipment needed to be able to prepare more ingredients sous vide and to remodel our patio. In September, we added a vegan menu (current menu), which has been pretty popular. More recently, we enclosed our porch to create the “little bar,” which provides a cozy space for guests waiting for a table or for those who just want a quick nibble and sip.

These past few months, with the economy the way it is, have been tough for everyone. It has been a sobering reminder that, even with an endorsement from the NYT, no one can rest on her laurels. We are most grateful for all that we have and we hope that those who haven’t been as fortunate are able to get back on their feet soon.

We look forward to 2009, our new president, and more opportunities to share Tilth with our guests.

Happy New Year!

Maria Hines and the Tilth Staff

P.S. If you don’t have New Year’s plans yet, join us:

New Year’s Eve Menu
$95 (includes wine pairings)
please choose one from each course

First
Sylver Spot Prawn Soup
spot prawn salpicon, coral toast

Oxbow Farm Heirloom Lettuce
feta, holmquist orchard hazelnut, mustard vinaigrette

Bone Marrow Toast
bacon, butter lettuce, oven roasted tomato

Second
Butter Poached Alaskan King Crab
grapefruit, chive spaetzle, salsify

Seared Alaskan Salmon
collard green, sweet potato, semolina pudding

Truffled Carnaroli Risotto
parmesan, garlic, leek confit

Third
Smoked Heirloom Bean Cassoulet
wild mushroom, truffle, brioche crumb

Oven Roasted Goose + Goose Confit
cardoon, potato puree, pan jus

Sous Vide Venison Loin
bosc pear, chestnut, swiss chard

Fourth
Northwest Artisanal Cheese
Try one for 4 / three for 12 / five for 18
mostarda, cracker, nuts

Sweet Potato Pie
candied bacon, sweet potato chips, cayenne chantilly

Roasted Chestnut Sorbet
cranberry soup, chestnut honey, tuile cookie

Theo Chocolate Ganache Cake
chocolate shortbread, cocoa cream, sea salt

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New Vegan Menu
September 9, 2008, 9:54 pm
Filed under: From Maria, What's New

To All My Vegan Friends!

Starting now, I’ll be putting together a vegan tasting menu that will change every month.

I recently had lunch with one of my best friends, Eric, who has been vegan for over a year. Eating together at the table has always been a big part of our social time. Since then, I’ve been introduced to some delicious and some not so delicious vegan meals. From my omnivore perspective, I feel kind of bad about the limited full service restaurant options that are out there for those who commit to this honorable, animal friendly, carbon footprint-reducing, vegan diet. So in honor of all vegans, I’ll be putting something special together, just for you every month!

The menu will be inspired by the seasons and will be delicious enough for an omnivore to devour.  We’ll start with whole organic foods from local sources and cook them simply to let their flavors shine through!

I’ll be posting them on the blog the first of every month, so you can see what’s new!

Cheers,
Maria

Tilth Vegan Menu
September 2008

Smoked Date Tatin 3/7
Crostini, sherry gastrique, chive

Oxbow Farm Lettuces 7/13
mustard vinaigrette, french breakfast radish, hazelnut

King’s Garden French Melon 7/12
anise hyssop, black pepper, olive oil

Spelt Berry Risotto 12/23
Corn milk, romano bean, heirloom tomato

Bluebird Grain Farms Farro 12/23
sorrel, sweet pepper, baby artichoke

Billy Allstot Farm Peaches 6
fresh fig, peach coulis, mint

Chef-Owner
Maria Hines

Sous Chef
Larkin Young

* Consuming raw or undercooked foods may increase your risk of food-borne illness. Please note there is no organic certification for “wild” foods. Food items that are underlined may contain an ingredient that is not certified organic.



Tilth’s Second Anniversary
September 5, 2008, 1:24 pm
Filed under: Events, From Maria, What's New

Tilth turned two years old on September 2.

The thought of this causes me to reflect emotionally on the past year of challenges, accomplishments, stressful moments and happy moments that have been shared in this little restaurant that sits inside a 1910 craftsman home in a tucked-away neighborhood in Seattle.

Our second year started out a little shaky. I thought maybe the honeymoon period was over and we were not the hot, new restaurant anymore. Kids had gone back to school that month. The fall weather change and the opening of a bunch of other new restaurants had affected business. I started to panic a little. Is this what the normal business level is going to look like? How can I earn a living by losing money or barely covering our bills every month? Why in the hell did I decide to open a certified-organic restaurant with food that costs 40% more, making the bulk of it from scratch, and keeping the check average down below the competition’s (who aren’t even organic)?! Why in the hell did I choose go green and spend so much more money on toilet paper, hand soap, and detergent? I just opened a year ago, I’m still in debt up to my ears, and I have a lien on my house for this place! I put it all on the line, man, and for what?!

My future started to flash before my eyes. I’m going to be one of those old, bitter restaurant owners, using broken-down equipment, bitching about never making any money, shouting, “Do you know how much that cost me?!” every time the staff breaks something, grumbling about how I’m too old to be chasing twenty-year olds around the restaurant doing my best to manage them, spending my dying days just trying to get by, with no retirement in sight. What a kill joy!!

I thought owning a restaurant was supposed to be glamorous, exhilarating, sexy, fun. I thought every night was supposed to be packed, with that buzz in the room of lots of people enjoying themselves, having a great time, and me walkin’ around with a smile on my face saying “Yeah, that’s right! You know it! This is my restaurant! It’s the place to be! I’m livin’ a dream! And you’re all here sharing it with me!”

But that September, October, November of last year was a little quiet in the dining room and money was tight. My cooks who worked during that time called it “the great depression.” Due to the fact that every night around 9 p.m. I’d say, “Okay, who’s going home early? Sorry guys, it won’t be like this all the time.” And the unlucky cook of the night would bow his head down at the thought of money loss to pay their own bills, would loyally say “Okay, chef” and he’d come back the next day ready to work hard, still believing in the food we we’re cooking, trusting in me that “It won’t be like this all the time.” The knot in my stomach got just a little tighter each night I had to say that phrase.

Than December came and the holidays were here! People were spending money and coming in to Tilth to celebrate! Lots of them. The cooks got their hours on the clock, servers got their tips, I was payin’ the bills with no problem! Things were turning around! A reminder of the joys of restaurant ownership was back!

And then, we had that spell of torrential downpour weather and the main sewer line backed up. During brunch service on a Saturday, of course. A few short hours later, it was apparent that we would not be opening on time for Saturday night dinner service. The busiest night of the week! The plumber said that if he couldn’t clear the sewer line that was backed up to the street (due to a crack in the original pipe of the ever so charming 1910 house), we may need to close for six weeks to fix the pipe. And also get city permits to close down 45th street, break through the asphalt, to do the work on the pipe. This would cost about 50K, not including loss of business. While I had three plumbing companies come out to try and fix the problem over the next three days, I was simultaneously having to prepare to put down my 22-and-a-half-year old cat that I’ve had since I was 17 years old! If I had to close for six weeks, the restaurant would possibly have to fold. I had hardly any business savings, no personal collateral for a business loan, and minimal money stashed in retirement. My only shot would be to ask my silent investors to bail us out this mess. Then on Monday, one hour before service, the massive jetter the plumbers brought in, cleared the sewer line and we were back in business! Ahhhhh, a sigh of relief.

Back to great holiday business all the way through January! Little did we know, Frank Bruni, restaurant critic from the New York Times, came in to dinner to review us for his ten best new restaurants outside of New York City list. We made the list! The article came out at the end of February and Tilth has been packed every night since. Me and my staff felt on top of the world! We were challenged with how to keep up with this staggering new pace. The old equipment was getting pummeled from so much use, we were scrambling around trying to keep up with prep, we just couldn’t seem to have enough servers on the floor, and the expectation from the guest was through the roof. It’s every restaurant owner’s dream to have this happen! On top of it all, I was able to provide my guests and my staff with things that were needed. Like oh say, a beautiful patio to sit on that doesn’t have rotten deck boards, a women’s restroom toilet that doesn’t slightly back up every Saturday night, a stereo system that has more than two speakers for the entire dining room, and a piece of mind sitting in the bank for that rainy day when the plumbing goes out.

Currently, we’re packed every night, with that buzz in the room of people enjoying themselves, having a great time, with me walkin’ around with a smile on my face saying “Yeah that’s right! You know it! This is my restaurant! This is the place to be! I’m livin’ a dream! And you’re all here sharing it with me!”

I thank all of you for coming in to Tilth and dining with us. If it weren’t for your continued support and wonderful energy, we wouldn’t be able to continue to do what we love to do. Which is to feed you delicious organic food, make you feel comfortable and cared for, and generating a feeling of shared happiness at Tilth.



Food Arts
August 28, 2008, 11:32 am
Filed under: In the Media, Recipes

Tilt was featured in Food Arts, too:

Maria Hines, Tilth, Seattle

“Tilth is one of only two restaurants in the country to receive organic certification from Oregon Tilth. Our restaurant is located in a 1917 bungalow house set in the middle of a neighborhood. I didn’t go out looking for a house to put my restaurant in. It just happened that way.”

Appetizer Porcini crème brûlée with vanilla emulsion & porcini dust. “Lucky for us, there are more varieties of wild mushrooms in the Pacific Northwest than in any other part of the world. Our porcini come from a local forager who collects them for us on the Olympic Peninsula. The crème brülée base includes a porcini-infused cream made by simmering dried mushrooms in heavy cream for an hour before steeping overnight. The next day, the cream is gently reheated and strained before the egg yolks are added. Fresh porcini are then diced, sautéed in a little butter, and seasoned before getting pureed and added to the cream base. The custards are baked in ramekins in a water bath and allowed to come to room temperature before chilling. Cooling the créme brûlée to room temperature before refrigeration seems to result in a more supple texture. To serve, sprinkle the surface with sugar and a little fleur de sel for balance; torch to caramelize. Serve with a frisée salad dressed with lemon juice, extra-virgin olive oil, parsley, shallots, salt, and pepper; vanilla bean–infused whole milk frothed with a hand blender; and a dusting of ground dried porcini.”

Entrées Braised rabbit with piperade, polenta cake & Parmesan broth. “Cure rabbit legs in a 50-50 mixture of salt and sugar with parsley stems, garlic, peppercorns, coriander, fennel seeds, bay leaf, cloves, yellow onions, and fresh thyme. After four hours, rinse, dry, and braise in duck fat until the meat is falling off the bone. Serve the legs resting atop a pan-seared polenta cake made from Anson Mills [Columbia, South Carolina] stone-ground polenta flavored with minced shallots and onions in a shallow bowl. Garnish with piperade, the Basque dish of stewed roasted peppers, tomatoes, onions, garlic, olive oil, and thyme finished with fresh parsley, chives, and Garnacha [red wine] vinegar. Ladle some Parmesan broth into each bowl.”

Skagit River Ranch goat chop with preserved plums, baby chickpeas & black mint. “All the meat that comes out of Skagit River Ranch in Washington is awesome. To help tenderize the goat chops, soak them overnight in milk before seasoning and searing to medium. Serve them over braised baby chickpeas finished to order with shallots, minced garlic, white wine, butter, parsley, and chives. I always season my chickpeas after they’ve been soaked and braised be cause adding salt too early seems to prevent them from cooking properly. For the preserved plums, poach Dandy Dapple plums in a simple syrup flavored with red wine, cinnamon stick, bay leaf, and thyme. Remove the skins, dice, and simmer for 20 minutes in the poaching liquid before serving over the chop. Garnish with a chiffonade of black mint and a reduction of the plum poaching liquid.”

Dessert Apple/crème fraîche panna cotta with cinnamon caramel sauce, apple gastrique & streusel. “Sauté chopped Gala apples in brown butter with lemon juice and a pinch of salt until tender; puree; add to a base of warm milk, homemade crème fraîche, and bloomed gelatin; pour into molds; chill until set. To serve, paint plates with some cinnamon caramel sauce; unmold panna cottas; using an apple corer, hollow out their centers; fill the holes with some more cinnamon caramel sauce; cover the opening with crunchy, baked streusel crumb topping. Garnish each with a thin apple chip, and drizzle the plates with a syrupy gastrique of apple juice, sugar, and lemon juice.”

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